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  • Summary: 

    The narrow, unpaved road snaking through the desert of Upper Egypt does one thing. It connects visitors from Al Minya, the capital city of the Al Minya governorate, to Bishop Samuel Monastery, a Coptic Orthodox institution. The road with no name was carved out for this purpose in the 12th century. Today, as in the ancient day, only Christians have use for this road. Not a soul dares this trip when the Winds of Kamasin whip up the sands from across the great desert in May and June. The air is unbreathable and the road disappears.  

    According to the Italian Agenzia Fides (June 9), Egypt’s Interior Minister, Magdi Abdel Ghaffar, during a June 8 meeting with high security officials, stated, “…that churches and monasteries will be at the center of appropriate security measures,” and “…that the state of emergency urges to reduce visits to churches and monasteries.” According to Agenzia, the state apparatus is also advising Christians to avoid “to gather conspicuous crowds at places of worship and prayer” during this emergency phase.  


    Ironically, mosques have had state security in place for a few years without the crime statistics to justify the measures. As long as the state deemed this necessary, Muslims were never advised to stay away, avoid worship and stop praying—probably because none of it was necessary. However, now the double standard feeds a divisive message.

    For Copts, it means one thing—subjection to Sharia law cloaked in national security regulations. Civilization jihad is being accomplished through state directives that intersect religious Islamic law and, conveniently, the emergency phase can last indefinitely. Meanwhile, Muslim gangs act independent of the state (at times complicit with them) on the Sharia mandate to stop Christian worship and prayer by physically attacking Christians praying in their homes, and police follow with arrests of Christians. 

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