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Minnesota Muslims brutally honest: 'We want Shariah'

Minnesota Muslims brutally honest: 'We want Shariah'

Country: 
United States of America (the)
News Date: 
29/05/2015
Lancastrian
Summary: 

One young man with dark sunglasses and a big smile, followed by another in a plaid dress shirt, and another with long hair stuffed under a Brooklyn Nets baseball cap, all said they would prefer to live under Islamic law rather than American law.

"I'm a Muslim. I prefer Shariah law," the man in the dress shirt said.

"Shariah law, yes," said another.

Asked if most of his friends felt the same way, he responded, "Of course if you're a Muslim, yeah."

A woman wearing a pink hijab and traditional dress was asked if it's OK for a father to make his young daughter marry a man of his choice.

"Yeah, yeah, he can, he can. He has the authority, you know, yeah, to do that."

"How young do you think it is OK?" the interviewer asked.

"Ah, yeah, 15," she answered.

The youngest person interviewed, a boy who appeared no more than 14 or 15, said it was easy to be a Muslim in his local school. He said he did not experience any persecution being a Muslim in Minneapolis.

He said he would prefer Shariah, however, because it was a much "tighter" society and, therefore, less prone to crime.

"Shariah law, it says that if you steal something, they cut off your hand," the boy said, making a cutting motion with one hand against the other. "So, basically, they can leave their doors open. Nobody's going to steal anything because Shariah is so tight. Usually, they don't do anything. The smallest things usually have big consequences.

Blaspheming the 'prophet'

Then the questions turned to Islamic blasphemy laws and the controversy with people depicting the Muslim "prophet" Muhammad in cartoons.

"How does that whole thing make you feel?" the interviewer asked.

"That really pisses me off, you know what I mean. I mean, they know it is a button to push," said the young man in the baseball cap.

Then came another Somali man with a beard and a jacket. He was more animated than the others.

"I was so upset, and I was so mad. They insulted our religion. They insulted our prophet, and we couldn't take it," he said, shaking his fist and flailing his arms.

"And you shouldn't be allowed to do that?" the interviewer asked.

"Oh my God, big time, yes!" he answered.

They were then asked if they understood the motivation of people who struck back violently against such depictions of the prophet.

"Yeah, I understand totally where they're coming from, yeah," said the young man in the ball cap.