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Nigeria: jails backlogged with prisoners in lengthy wait of sharia stonings and amputations

Nigeria: jails backlogged with prisoners in lengthy wait of sharia stonings and amputations

Country: 
Nigeria
News Date: 
09/05/2019
Lancastrian
Summary: 

In a prison in a village in Nigeria, “the condemned convicts we have are mostly coming from Sharia Courts. These and other related cases like amputation of hand or leg have been in jail for over 10 years without knowing their fate. Their hands are not cut off, their legs are not cut off, they don’t know their fate.”

The thought of not knowing for years on what day ones amputation or stoning might happen is a harsh punishment in itself.  The barbaric sentences handed down by sharia courts is what so-called human rights organizations need to be condemning in the strongest possible terms; but Western organizations are afraid to address barbaric practices in Islam for fear of being called “racist” and “Islamophobic”.

Westerners have been bullied by Muslim lobbies to prioritize political correctness and the hurt feelings of Muslims over the lives and well-being of victims.

Mainstream conversations about human rights are often overshadowed by non-existent concerns about “Islamophobia” instead of the abuses committed by Muslims against minority groups, women and apostates. How about some sympathy and advocacy for five people (among others globally) “sentenced to death-by-stoning; and 10 others whose legs and hands are to be amputated are awaiting the day of judgment.”

“Sharia Court To Chop Off Hands And Legs Of 10 People, Stone 5 To Death In Bauchi State”, by Ngere Ify Davies,, May 8, 2019:

“The condemned convicts we have are mostly coming from Sharia Courts. These and other related cases like amputation of hand or leg have been in jail for over 10 years without knowing their fate. Their hands are not cut off, their legs are not cut off, they don’t know their fate.

“There are also those who are supposed to be stoned to death. I am worried. I feel touched that each time I go to any of the prisons to visit, they’ll be the first to confront me with questions about their case. I have written to the state governor, I have also written to the state Chief Judge to see that something is done about these people. They’re the only category of people that cannot be taken to court because they have already been convicted, but there’s no execution.”