Author(s):

ECHR Ruling: 

"sharia law is incompatible with democracy and human rights"

Source: 

Annual Report 2003 of the European Court of Human Rights

Council of Europe

Summary: 

Why is it that the New York Times and the Washington Post and the Guardian, when they bother to english it at all, continue to translate “Allahu akbar” as  “God is great”? Why does the BBC stick with “God is greatest”? And why can’t the Western media that, with “God is greater,” come the closest to what the phrase means, convey the proper meaning by adding a few words: “Our God is greater than your God”? It could reflect ignorance: they just don’t know what the phrase, when used by jihadis, means. Or it could reflect a deliberate desire not to convey the true meaning of the phrase, with its obvious supremacism that can only harden hearts and minds against Muslims. And that, of course, would never do.

Now  supposing some intelligent journalists — even at the Times, even at the Post — are willing to concede that the best way to translate the phrase “Allahu akbar” is “Our God is greater than your God.” But they are faced with doubters, who insist that that translation is too long and too unwieldy  for a newspaper article. Just think, they say, of how it would read: “Mert Ney shouted ‘Allahu akbar’ (‘Our God is greater than your God’) as he stabbed random people in Sydney.” Or imagine someone on the radio saying it: “Said Kouachi shouted ‘Allahu akbar’ (‘Our God is greater than your God’) as he ran from the office of Charlie Hebdo.” It could be rejected for its length alone. There is a simple way to convey the meaning of “Allahu akbar,” without having to add all those  words. That is to begin with the possessive pronoun: “Our God is greater.” The “Our” is in obvious opposition to the unstated “Your.” And the triumphalist essence of “Allahu akbar,” when a jihadi uses  the phrase — “Our God is greater than Your God” — is properly conveyed.

Country: 
Austria
News Date: 
15/08/2019
Summary: 

“Taking dogs in Innsbruck taxis remains an adventure,” translated from “Mitnahme von Hunden in Innsbrucker Taxis bleibt ein Aufreger,” by Michael Domanig, , August 8, 2019 (thanks to ):

Summary: 

Boris Johnson says it is time to reassert British values in the face of extremist Islam.

Supporters of the war have retorted that Iraq cannot be said to be a whole and sufficient explanation for the existence of suicidal Islamic cells in the West, and they, too, have a point. The threat from Islamicist nutters preceded 9/11; they bombed the Paris Métro in the 1990s; and it is evident that the threat to British lives pre-dates the Iraq war, when you think that roughly the same number of Britons died in the World Trade Center as died in last week’s bombings. In other words, the Iraq war did not create the problem of murderous Islamic fundamentalists, though the war has unquestionably sharpened the resentments felt by such people in this country, and given them a new pretext. The Iraq war did not introduce the poison into our bloodstream but, yes, the war did help to potentiate that poison. And whatever the defenders of the war may say, it has not solved the problem of Islamic terror, or even come close to providing the beginnings of a solution. You can’t claim to be draining the swamp in the Middle East when the mosquitoes are breeding quite happily in Yorkshire.

The question is what action we take now to solve the problem in our own country, and what language we should use to describe such action. The first step, as we swaddle London and Yorkshire with Police/Do Not Cross tape, is to ban the phrase ‘war on terror’, as repeatedly used by G.W. Bush, most recently on 7 July in Edinburgh, with Blair nodding beside him. There is nothing wrong in principle in waging war on an abstract noun; the British navy successfully waged a war on slavery, by which they meant a war on slavers. But if we continue to say that we are engaged in a war with these people, then we concede several points to the enemy, and set up a series of odious false equivalences.

Country: 
Pakistan
News Date: 
14/08/2019
Summary: 

The brutal persecution of young Christian girls in Pakistan is ongoing, and largely ignored by “feminists” and fake human rights activists, who call it “Islamophobic” to shed light on such atrocities:

Country: 
Indonesia
News Date: 
14/08/2019
Summary: 

However, a rumour spread in her neighbourhood that Meiliana wanted adzan to be banned altogether. This rumour provoked public anger and in the week that followed vigilantes burned down numerous Buddhist temples. Eight rioters were arrested and convicted, receiving jail terms of one to four months.After investigating the riot, the local police described Meiliana as the provocateur and formally accused her of blasphemy.

Summary: 

Sometimes challenges to jihadist orthodoxies come from the most surprising places. A challenge to the idea that ‘Islamophobia’ equals racism has been made by an influential and seemingly widely supported Islamic cleric.

Yahya Cholil Staquf, the leader of an Indonesia based Islamic sect that claims 90 million adherents that it was some aspects of Islam itself that are creating and sustaining conflict. Mr Staquf wrote an article in the UK Daily Telegraph and quoted by the website of the Christian Barnabas Fund, in which he said that the ‘Islamic mindset must change’. He took aim at the Islamic orthodoxy that fuels both jihadists and other Islamic extremists in places like Europe and called that orthodoxy ‘obsolete and problematic” and “fuelling violence on both sides”.

Mr Staquf is in my opinion correct in his assertions. Many of us do not despise Islam for reasons related to ignorance or mindless bigotry, but because of the theology of Islam that propels some Muslims to do the most appalling things. These terrible things are done either in the name of Islam or because the perpetrators grew up in a culture that promoted Islamic orthodoxy and that has become the world view of these individuals. It is as Mr Staquf said the ‘perpetual enmity’ between Muslim and non Muslim that is encouraged by shariah law and has its roots in the Koran. It is good to see this cleric be honest and admit that Islamic terrorism is everything to do with Islam.

Author(s):

Summary: 

Five years after the Islamic State’s massacre of Yazidis in Sinjar, Iraq, it seems harder than ever to get Western leaders to live up to protecting minority ethnic or religious groups from extinction in the Middle East.

Country: 
India
News Date: 
11/08/2019
Summary: 

But recollections of his home town stop age four-and-a-half when he was forced to flee to Delhi with three generations of his family as brutal majority Muslim mobs ran riot. “I hope that no child in the world has to see what I have seen,” Rohit said.  

...

Country: 
United Kingdom (UK)
News Date: 
07/08/2019
Summary: 

Two women in Muslim dress were caught in an apparent attempt to use their outfits to steal dozens of items from a supermarket.

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