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  • Summary: 

    The West’s movement towards the truth is remarkably slow. We drag ourselves towards it painfully, inch by inch, after each bloody Islamist assault.

    In France, Britain, Germany, America and nearly every other country in the world it remains government policy to say that any and all attacks carried out in the name of Mohammed have ‘nothing to do with Islam’. It was said by George W. Bush after 9/11, Tony Blair after 7/7 and Tony Abbott after the Sydney attack last month. It is what David Cameron said after two British extremists cut off the head of Drummer Lee Rigby in London, when ‘Jihadi John’ cut off the head of aid worker Alan Henning in the ‘Islamic State’ and when Islamic extremists attacked a Kenyan mall, separated the Muslims from the Christians and shot the latter in the head. And, of course, it is what President François Hollande said after the massacre of journalists and Jews in Paris last week.

    ...

    There may be some positive things to be said about Mohammed, but I thought this was pushing things too far and mentioned just one occasion when Mohammed didn’t welcome a critic. Asma bint Marwan was a female poetess who mocked the ‘Prophet’ and who, as a result, Mohammed had killed. It is in the texts. It is not a problem for me. But I can understand why it is a problem for decent Muslims. The moment I said this, my Muslim colleague went berserk. How dare I say this? I replied that it was in the Hadith and had a respectable chain of transmission (an important debate). He said it was a fabrication which he would not allow to stand. The upshot was that he refused to continue unless all mention of this was wiped from the recording. The BBC team agreed and I was left trying to find another way to express the same point. The broadcast had this ‘offensive’ fact left out.

  • Country: 
    United Kingdom (UK)
    News Date: 
    13/11/2018
    Summary: 

    The National Secular Society has urged the BBC to treat free expression "as a positive value" as it raised concerns that new guidelines defer excessively to religious sensitivities. In response to a consultation on the 

  • Country: 
    United Kingdom (UK)
    News Date: 
    16/01/2009
  • Country: 
    United Kingdom (UK)
    News Date: 
    21/03/2018
    Summary: 

    Here I must, with reluctance, raise two difficult topics that highlight the problems with the representation of Christianity. The first is the BBC and Islam. Were the neglect of the Christian faith part of a universal disregard for spirituality or religion then our complaints might be muted. But it is not so. There is a general consensus amongst Christians that, in contrast to an almost untouchable Islam, we are ‘fair game’. Indeed there is a perception that if someone wants to make a dig at religion in general then we are the people that they choose to attack.

  • Summary: 

    The future of modern Britain looks set to be an unusually complicated affair. Take just one piece of news that came out of the trial of Darren Osborne over recent days. According to relatives of the Finsbury Park attacker, the first trigger towards his radicalisation was watching the BBC drama Three Girls about the Rochdale grooming gangs. Evidence suggests that this drama put him on the path to deciding to hire a van and drive it into a group of Muslims in Finsbury Park a few weeks later, murdering 51-year old Makram Ali. Now of course the BBC’s drama department should not be held responsible for the death of Mr Ali. Though I would love to see a real debate on Newsnight or the like in which the BBC questioned its own apparent role in this terrible business. But just how much more complicated can things get?

    Admin: The only complicating factor is the denial of the role of islam-sharia in jihad, .

  • Country: 
    United Kingdom (UK)
    News Date: 
    18/03/2017
    Summary: 

    A self-identified Birmingham Muslim has told the BBC that those who “insult Islam” should be subject to the death penalty, during a discussion on blasphemy organised by the broadcaster’s Asian Network. On March 17th, the  broadcast a programme 

  • The BBC Asian network asked the question "What should be the penalty for blasphemy?". As Paul Joseph Watson (Editor of InfoWars) commented "This is the 21st century."

  • Country: 
    United Kingdom (UK)
    News Date: 
    09/01/2015
    Summary: 

    The National Secular Society is calling on the Government to compel the BBC to remove a on any depiction of the prophet Mohammed. The BBC's editorial guidance that forbid any representation of the prophet Mohammed came under fire on Thursday's Question Time on BBC1.

  • Country: 
    United Kingdom (UK)
    News Date: 
    27/02/2012
    Summary: 

    In a wide-ranging interview about faith and broadcasting, Mr Thompson disclosed that producers were faced with the possibilities of “violent threats” instead of normal complaints if they broadcast certain types of satire. He suggested other faiths had “very close identity with ethnic minorities” and as a result were covered in a more careful way by broadcasters. “Without question, ‘I complain in the strongest possible terms’, is different from, ‘I complain in the strongest possible terms and I am loading my AK47 as I write’,” he said. “This definitely raises the stakes.”

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