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  • Country: 
    Mauritania
    News Date: 
    12/06/2018
    Summary: 

    Islamic apologists in the West routinely insist that Islam has no death penalty for apostasy, but as always, reality is otherwise. The death penalty for apostasy is part of Islamic law. It’s based on the Qur’an: “They wish you would disbelieve as they disbelieved so you would be alike. So do not take from among them allies until they emigrate for the cause of Allah. But if they turn away, then seize them and kill them wherever you find them and take not from among them any ally or helper.” (Qur’an 4:89)

    ...

  • Country: 
    Denmark
    News Date: 
    10/10/2015
    Summary: 

    Muslims in Denmark have begun to place more emphasis on their religion and religious practices. It shows a poll among Danish Muslims, which Wilke has made for Jyllands Posten, which is comparable to a similar measurement almost 10 years ago in 2006. At that time it was 37 per cent, which asked five times or more daily. Now it's exactly half, 50 per cent. Similarly, an increasing share - 77 per cent. - that the Quran's instructions should be fully followed by 62 per cent in 2006.

  • Country: 
    Netherlands (the)
    News Date: 
    08/06/2018
    Summary: 

    Religion has become more important to the Netherlands Muslim community over the past 10 years, due in part to rising tensions between population groups and a growing feeling of exclusion, the government’s socio-cultural think-tank SCP said in a new report. 

    ...

  • Summary: 
    • "The growing religiousness is not an expression of marginalization. We are talking about people who are well-integrated, but who want to be religious". — Professor Viggo Mortensen.

    • "The vision is an Islamic state -- Islamic society... Muslims will prefer sharia rule. But the vision for twenty years from now is for sharia law to be part of Germany, that sharia will be institutionalized in the state itself". — "Yusuf", in a documentary series, False Identity.

    • "I will pick them one by one -- I will start with people around me... If every Muslim would do the same in his surroundings, it can happen with no problem... you don't confront him [the German] with force; you do it slowly... There will be clashes, but slowly the clashes will subside, as people will accept reality." — "Yusuf", in a documentary series, False Identity.

    • Europe will still exist but, as with the great Christian Byzantine Empire that is now Turkey, will it still embody Judeo-Christian civilization?

  • Summary: 

    On the basis of an original survey among native Christians and Muslims of Turkish and Moroccan origin in Germany, France, the Netherlands, Belgium, Austria and Sweden, this paper investigates four research questions comparing native Christians to Muslim immigrants: (1) the extent of religious fundamentalism; (2) its socio-economic determinants; (3) whether it can be distinguished from other indicators of religiosity; and (4) its relationship to hostility towards out-groups (homosexuals, Jews, the West, and Muslims). The results indicate that religious fundamentalist attitudes are much more widespread among Sunnite Muslims than among native Christians, even after controlling for the different demographic and socio-economic compositions of these groups. Alevite Muslims from Turkey, by contrast, show low levels of fundamentalism, comparable to Christians. Among both Christians and Muslims, strong religiosity as such is not (among Christians) or only mildly (among Muslims) related to hostility towards out-groups. Fundamentalist believers, however, show very high levels of out-group hostility, especially among Muslims.

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