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  • Summary: 

    So what was brave Steve’s response to this? What was his trenchant embrace of blasphemy in solidarity with Charlie Hebdo and in defiance of Islamic fundamentalists? Well obviously, it was to have a really good go at Christianity. There followed a characteristically unpleasant series of cartoons lampooning God the Father – I don’t even want to go there – and the Pope, with a savage little skit on Francis for not taking the whole freedom of expression thing sufficiently seriously. As for similarly disobliging depictions of Mohammed? Yes, I looked for those in vain, though brave Steve did take a very hard line on Isis individuals decapitating infidels.

    So the considered response of a prominent liberal cartoonist to the murder of cartoonists for alleged blasphemy and disrespecting Islam, was to go for Christianity, lampooning both God the Father and God the son. Plus the Pope. Yes, that’s just about where we’re at when it comes to blasphemy in an age of unbelief. Rather a hit and miss affair, wouldn’t you say?

  • Summary: 

    Initial scholarship focused on various ritual practices such as the beheading of infidels, but that was quickly dismissed as irrelevant. “With the axiomatic assumption that Islam is the Religion of Peace, any behavior we attempt to link to it must ipso facto be congruent with that assumption,” explained Regretdat. “We soon discovered just how many apparently solid connections between behaviors and Islam fell afoul of that axiom, and thus demonstrated we had stumbled on some coincidental association. This happened over and over again: with jihad, conquest, mass murder, oppression of religious minorities, incitement to commit murder, the jizya tax, Quranic and Hadith statements in support of genocide, you name it. It proved intensely frustrating. We’re beginning to doubt Islam is a factor in anyone’s behavior anywhere, in any manner.”

    Observers note the contrast between the findings, or lack thereof, regarding Islam, and the established characteristics of other groups. “We’ve seen any number of inherent characteristics among, say, right-wing Israelis,” said commentator Margot Wallstrom. “And you just know that if an Israeli pulls a trigger, it’s an extrajudicial execution. That’s a noticeable contrast. Also, if an Arab or Muslim does happen to commit a crime, while it obviously has nothing to do with being Arab or Muslim, it just as obviously is the direct result of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Which has nothing to do with Islam, of course.”

  • Summary: 

    It was George Orwell who pointed out, in an analysis of the goose-step, that it could only flourish in countries where people were afraid enough not to laugh at its silliness. Indeed, it’s very absurdity was a demonstration of power: ‘Yes, I am ugly, and you daren’t laugh at me.’

    ...

    The moral righteousness of such people makes ‘liberal media elite’ feel too slick and deodorising a label. They are the humbug junta – smug and hollow – who have hardened into a kind of cultural occupying power. A fitting subject for Monty Python, you might argue – if only they were still in licensed currency.

  • Country: 
    Netherlands (the)
    News Date: 
    29/08/2018
    Summary: 

     Dutch police on Tuesday arrested a man suspected of planning an attack against far-right politician Geert Wilders after he said he .

    Police said in a statement they arrested the still unidentified suspect at the main railway station in The Hague.

  • Country: 
    Netherlands (the)
    News Date: 
    10/07/2018
    Summary: 

    The leader of a Pakistani Islamist group vowed to 'wipe Holland off the face of the earth' with a nuclear attack in response to a Prophet Muhammad cartoon competition being held in the country.

  • Summary: 

    Progress can never be made if we can't satirise Islam, says Maajid Nawaz. The LBC presenter said we need the right to be able to blaspheme and criticise religion, because if people can't express their opinion verbally - they will turn to violence. Maajid passionately made the case for encouraging satire of Islam after writer and campaigner, Ayaan Hirsi Ali, said: 'We've had Life of Brian, now we need Life of Muhammad'.

  • Summary: 

    In 2005 the  sparked a heated international debate on the relationship between free speech and protection against religious discrimination. Whilst such tensions continue to be a source of conflict in the UN today, Marie Juul Petersen and Heini í Skorini look at what lies behind the actions of one of the key players in this debate, the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation (OIC).

    “Freedom of expression does not justify in any way whatsoever the defamation of religions.”  The Organisation of Islamic Cooperation (OIC), an intergovernmental umbrella organisation of 57 Muslim-majority states, was unequivocal in its condemnation of the Danish Muhammad cartoons, published in a press release a few months after the cartoons had been printed in the Danish newspaper Jyllandsposten in September 2005.

    ....

    The OIC is also alarmingly quiet when it comes to discrimination, intolerance and outright persecution in the organisation’s own member states. No OIC countries have criticised Saudi Arabia’s ban on churches. Nobody has directed attention to the increasing violence against Hindus in Malaysia. Nobody has spoken out against Egyptian newspapers for printing anti-Semitic cartoons. Nobody has criticized the many victims of the strictly enforced blasphemy laws in powerful OIC member states such as Saudi Arabia, Pakistan, Iran and Egypt. Not even clear examples of discrimination of Muslim minorities in OIC member states can bring the OIC to speak. Sunnis in Iran, Ahmadiyyas in Pakistan and Shias in Saudi Arabia enjoy little protection against discrimination and persecution.

  • Country: 
    United Kingdom (UK)
    News Date: 
    28/11/2014
  • Country: 
    United Kingdom (UK)
    News Date: 
    27/02/2012
    Summary: 

    In a wide-ranging interview about faith and broadcasting, Mr Thompson disclosed that producers were faced with the possibilities of “violent threats” instead of normal complaints if they broadcast certain types of satire. He suggested other faiths had “very close identity with ethnic minorities” and as a result were covered in a more careful way by broadcasters. “Without question, ‘I complain in the strongest possible terms’, is different from, ‘I complain in the strongest possible terms and I am loading my AK47 as I write’,” he said. “This definitely raises the stakes.”

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